Parade Ground Aircraft
A7 A10 B17 B24 B25 B26 B29 C45 C47 C118 C119 C121
C123 F15 F16 F82 P38 P47 P51 P63 SR71 T6 T28 T34
Other USAF Aircraft
Bombers
B1 B2 B45 B47 B50 B52 B58 F111 - - - -
Cargo, VIP, & Tanker
C5 C17 C21 C24 C46 C97 C130 C133 C140 C141 KC10 KC135
Experimental & Prototype
D558 F107 X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X15 XB70 YC14 - -
Fighters
A1 F4 F5 F22 F84 F84F F86 F86D F100 F101 F102 F104
F105 F106 F117 P40 P80 - - - - - - -
Helicopters
CH3E CH21 CH54A H5A HH43 MH60 R4B R6A UH1P UH13 UH19 V22
Reconnaissance
E3 O1G OV2 OV10 RF4 RF101 U2 - - - - -
Trainers
T6A T33 T37 T38 T41 - - - - - - -

North American F-82 Twin Mustang

The first Twin Mustangs began to reach the squadrons during 1948. In June of that year, the P-designation was changed to F, and the Twin Mustang became F-82 rather than P-82. The F-82E entered service in the long-range bomber escort role with the 27th Fighter Group (522nd, 523rd, and 524th Squadrons) of the Strategic Air Command. They spent their brief life flying alongside B-29s, and were replaced by jets in 1950. In 1948, the F and G night-fighter versions of the Twin Mustang began to replace the Northrop F-61 Black Widow in service with the Air Defense Command. They were painted all-black and had flame-damped exhausts.

The first Air Defense Command unit to take delivery of the F-82F was the 325th Fighter Group (317th, 318th, and 319th Squadrons) based at both Hamilton Field, California and McChord AFB, Washington, the 51st Fighter Group (16th, 25th, and 26th Squadrons) and the 52nd Fighter Group (2nd and 5th Squadrons) based at Mitchel AFB and McGuire AFB, New Jersey. In 1949, the 347th Fighter Group (4th, 68th, and 339th Squadrons) stationed in Japan received F-82Gs. The 449th Squadron of the 5001st Composite Group based at Ladd AFB in Alaska received the "cold-weather F-82Hs. By the middle of 1949, the Twin Mustang was in widespread service, some 225 E, F, and G models being on strength. It was anticipated that the service life of the Twin Mustang would be relatively brief, since the F-82 was seen as only an interim type, filling in the gap only until adequate numbers of jet fighters could be made available. In 1950, some units based in the USA were already beginning to replace their Twin Mustangs with jets. On June 25, 1950, the Korean War broke out.

The Twin Mustangs based in Japan were immediately thrown into combat to stem the North Korean advance. They were the only fighter aircraft available with the range to cover the entire Korean peninsula from bases in Japan. They provided fighter cover for the C-54 and C-47 transports flying in and out of Kimpo Airfield near Seoul. On June 27, 1950, an F-82G (46-383) of the 68th Fighter Squadron of the 347th Fighter Group flown by Lieut. William Hudson (pilot) and Lieut. Carl Fraser (radar operator) shot down a North Korean Yak-7U. This was the first air-to-air kill of the Korean War, and, incidentally, the first aerial victory by the newly-formed United States Air Force. Squadron records have been lost, and memory is unreliable, and it is possible that Lt. Hudson was actually flying 46-601 that day. Later that same day, an F-82G (46-392) flown by Major James Little of the 339th Fighter Squadron of the 347th Fighter Group shot down a North Korean Yak-9. Records are unreliable, and some experts maintain that Major Little actually was the first to kill. The Twin Mustang saw extensive service in Korea until November of 1951, serving in both escort and ground attack roles. However, the F-82 played a secondary role as compared with its distinguished predecessor, the single-engined F-51. As more jets became available, the F-82s were withdrawn from combat and phased out of service.

The last Twin Mustang was retired from service in mid-1953.

SPECIFICATIONS Span: 51 ft. 3 in. Length: 38 ft. 1 in. Height: 13 ft. 8 in. Weight: 24,800 lbs. max. Armament: Six .50-cal. machine guns, 25 five-inch rockets, and 4,000 lbs. of bombs Engines: Two Packard V-1650s of 1,380 hp. ea. Cost: $228,000

PERFORMANCE Maximum speed: 482 mph. Cruising speed: 280 mph. Range: 2,200 miles Service Ceiling: 39,000 ft.

This Twin-Mustang is owned by the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) in Texas

It was undergoing a complete restoration back to flying status in 2005

 

 

Parade Ground Aircraft
A7 A10 B17 B24 B25 B26 B29 C45 C47 C118 C119 C121
C123 F15 F16 F82 P38 P47 P51 P63 SR71 T6 T28 T34
Other USAF Aircraft
Bombers
B1 B2 B45 B47 B50 B52 B58 F111 - - - -
Cargo, VIP, & Tanker
C5 C17 C21 C24 C46 C97 C130 C133 C140 C141 KC10 KC135
Experimental & Prototype
D558 F107 X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X15 XB70 YC14 - -
Fighters
A1 F4 F5 F22 F84 F84F F86 F86D F100 F101 F102 F104
F105 F106 F117 P40 P80 - - - - - - -
Helicopters
CH3E CH21 CH54A H5A HH43 MH60 R4B R6A UH1P UH13 UH19 V22
Reconnaissance
E3 O1G OV2 OV10 RF4 RF101 U2 - - - - -
Trainers
T6A T33 T37 T38 T41 - - - - - - -